Last edited by Sabei
Friday, July 31, 2020 | History

1 edition of Studies on physiological problems of stress in higher plants found in the catalog.

Studies on physiological problems of stress in higher plants

Studies on physiological problems of stress in higher plants

  • 128 Want to read
  • 15 Currently reading

Published by The Volcani Institute of Agricultural Research in Rehovot, Israel .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Plants, Effect of salt on.,
  • Plant physiology.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementB. Kessler ... [et al.]
    ContributionsKessler, B., Mekhon V Đolk Đani le-h Đek Đer ha-h Đak Đla ơut.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination73 p. :
    Number of Pages73
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14222202M

      Stress wreaks havoc on the mind and body. Until now, it has not been clear exactly how stress influences disease and health. Now researchers have . cal functions of particular plants or plant organs. Some of the finest stud-ies of plant physiological ecology have compared physiological re-sponses to stress in related plants from locations characterized by ex-tremes of single environmental fac-tors. But in nature, covariation of and interaction between major stress fac-tors is the norm.

    Table of Contents. General concepts: introduction to the response of plants to environmental stresses; the importance of individuality; plant cell wall modifications induced by adaptation to growth on the herbicide 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile; gene switches and stress management -modulation of gene expression by transcription factors; stressful lifestyle-associated mutation . Stress and strain terminology. Physical stress strain. Biological stress strain. The nature of stress injury and stress resistance. Kinds of stress tolerance. temperature stresses. Low-temperature stress - limits of tolerance. Dehydrated protoplasm. Hydrated protoplasm. Clilling injury. Chilling stress. Chilling resistance. Mechanism of chilling resistance.

      Water Stress and Crop Plants: A Sustainable Approach presents an up-to-date in-depth coverage of drought and flooding stress in plants, including the types, causes and consequences on plant growth and development. It discusses the physiobiochemical, molecular and omic approaches, and responses of crop plants towards water stress. The unique responses of plants to combined stresses have been observed at physiological, biochemical, and molecular levels. This book provides an analysis of all three levels of change in various plants in response to different combinations of stresses.


Share this book
You might also like
Corn diseases in the United States and their control

Corn diseases in the United States and their control

The diversity of green plants

The diversity of green plants

challenge to pharmacy in times of change

challenge to pharmacy in times of change

Michael Strogoff

Michael Strogoff

The New-York reader.

The New-York reader.

On the use and abuse of alcoholic liquors, in health and disease

On the use and abuse of alcoholic liquors, in health and disease

The Original British theatre directory.

The Original British theatre directory.

American vegetable practice

American vegetable practice

Micromechanical modeling of the finite deformation of thermoelastic multiphase composites

Micromechanical modeling of the finite deformation of thermoelastic multiphase composites

Two poolsin a field

Two poolsin a field

Kilmeny of the orchard

Kilmeny of the orchard

Common sense, original appendix and Crisis for 1776

Common sense, original appendix and Crisis for 1776

Los Angeles Clippers 2006 Calendar

Los Angeles Clippers 2006 Calendar

Studies on physiological problems of stress in higher plants Download PDF EPUB FB2

Environmental stress causes changes in leaves and the structure of plants. Although physiological adaptations to stress by plants have been explored, the effect of stress on the spectral. productivity is higher (Lohr et al., ). Studies on the benefits of plants are contributing to an increased use of plants to solve both environmental and health problems.

The physical cause of the tangible effects, such as removing air pollutants, are relatively well understood. The basis for theCited by: The major abiotic stresses such as drought, salinity, heat stress and water-logging are the main climatic factors for declining crop production in many developing countries [2,3,4].

Written by an international team of experts, this book provides researchers with a better understanding of the major physiological and molecular mechanisms facilitating plant tolerance to adverse environmental factors. It is an essential resource for researchers and students of ecology, plant biology, agriculture, agronomy, and plant : Hardcover.

Introduction. Plants and animals share some response mechanisms to unfavorable environmental conditions; however, plants, being sessile organisms, have developed, in the course of their evolution, highly sophisticated and efficient strategies of response to cope with and adapt to different types of abiotic and biotic stress imposed by the frequently adverse Cited by: The shared responses under combined stresses constitute the generic morpho-physiological and molecular events evoked by both stresses constituting stress combination (Supplementary Table 1).For example, drought, salinity, and chilling induce osmotic effect on plants resulting in induction of common physiological processes, one of which is accumulation of osmoprotectants Cited by:   Developments in information technology cause a great deal of stress to modern people, and controlling this stress now becomes an important issue.

The aim of this study was to examine psychological and physiological benefits of interaction with indoor plants. The study subjects were 24 young male adults at the age of ± (mean ± SD).Cited by: Completely updated from the successful first edition, this book provides a timely update on the recent progress in our knowledge of all aspects of plant perception, signalling and adaptation to a variety of environmental stresses.

It covers in detail areas such as drought, salinity, waterlogging, oxidative stress, pathogens, and extremes of temperature and pH.

This. The first comprehensive treatment of the physiology of plants under stress. Physiology of Plants Under Stress: Environmental Factors, Volume 1 is a valuable resource for plant physiologists, horticulturists, crop scientists, plant breeders, agronomists, and plant molecular by: Plants, unlike animals, are sessile.

This demands that adverse changes in their environment are quickly recognized, distinguished and responded to with suitable reactions.

Drought, heat, cold and salinity are among the major abiotic stresses that adversely affect plant growth and productivity. In general, abiotic stress often causes a series of morphological, physiological, Cited by: This 2nd edition provides a timely update on the recent progress in our knowledge of all aspects of plant perception, signalling and adaptation to a variety of environmental stresses.

It covers in detail areas such as drought, salinity, flooding, oxidative stress, pathogens, and extremes of temperature and soil pH. Chronic stress is a pathological state that is caused by prolonged activation of the normal acute physiological stress response, which can wreak havoc on immune, metabolic and cardiovascular.

Summary. Continuous discoveries in plant and crop physiology have resulted in an abundance of new information since the publication of the second edition of the Handbook of Plant and Crop Physiology, necessitating a new edition to cover the latest advances in the its predecessors, the Third Edition offers a unique, complete collection of topics in plant and crop.

Stress is a natural feeling of not being able to cope with specific demands and events. However, stress can become a chronic condition if. measurement of a physiological phenomenon in a plant species under a suboptimal, stress condition compared to the measurement of the same physiological phenomenon in the same plant species under optimal conditions.

Plants respond to stress in several different ways. Plant stress can be divided into two primary categories. Effects of Light and Plant Growth Regulators on Polyamine Metabolism in Higher Plants (Rajeev Rastogi and Peter J.

Davies). Physiological and Biochemical Studies on the Antisenescence Properties of Polyamines in Plants (Ravindar Kaur-Sawhney and Arthur W. Galston). Changes in Polyamine Metabolism in Response to Abiotic Stress (Hector E.

Flores). "This book provides a timely update on the recent progress in our knowledge of all aspects of plant's perception, signalling and adaptation to a variety of environmental stresses such as drought, salinity, heat, cold, frost and soil pH extremes, Al and heavy metal toxicities, desiccation, waterlogging, UV, oxidative stress and pathogens.

It provides a comprehensive. physiological responses of plants and crops to stress. Several examples of empirical investigations of spe-cific plants and crops grown under stressful conditions are presented.

The single—but thorough—chapter in Part VIII, Physiological Relationships Between Lower and Higher Plants, presents detailed information on this relationship.

One of the prime detrimental effects of NP release in the environment is induction of oxidative stress, which is a complex physiological, biochemical, and molecular phenomenon that accompanies virtually all biotic and abiotic stresses in higher plants and develops as a result of overproduction and accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS).

Stress response, or state of stress, or stress, describes the response of the cell, plant or ecosystem, following exposure to a stressor eu-stress / reversible stress = a mild, acclimative, often specific response to a stressor distress / irreversible stress = a.

A number of studies report increased ROS accumulation and oxidative stress in plants under drought stress [85, 86]. When stomata close in order to limit water loss, there is the occurrence of either a restricted CO 2 supply or CO 2-limited carbon fixation and reduced NADP + regeneration through the Calvin by: Unusual metal and cysteine-rich proteins, generally Studies on cadmium toxicity in plants: a review 31 named metallothioneins, have been recognised as some of the major metal-binding proteins in various kinds of plants and microorganisms (Fujita and Kawanishi, ).Cited by: Plant Abiotic Stress publishes research on the interactions of plants and environmental factors that can cause negative effects on plant growth and survival.

These interactions can be analyzed and described at the cellular, biochemical, physiological, tissue, organ, whole-plant, or population level. Abiotic stress comprises all non-living factors that affect plants beyond the normal range .